SUBMitting is now easier than ever!

There are three ways you can submit to the 2016 Iris Prize Festival. Please follow the links below:

Withoutabox
FilmFreeway
Website
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Film Submission Timeline:

  • Submissions Open: 11 January 2016
  • Earlybird Deadline: 30 March 2016
  • Regular Deadline: 01 June 2016
  • Late Deadline / Submissions Close: 01 July 2016

A shortlist of 35 entries for the Iris Prize, 15 entries for the Iris Prize Best British Short, and up to 20 Feature Films will be selected to screen as part of the Iris Prize Festival held in Cardiff, Wales (UK) from 12 – 16 October 2016. The five-day event also includes a country focus, masterclasses, panel sessions, parties, and the glittering Iris Awards ceremony.

If you have any questions, please contact nathaniel@irisprize.org

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The Iris Prize Festival is an international LGBT film festival that attracts a mixed audience, and awards three main prizes:

The Iris Prize

The winner of the Iris Prize 2016 will be invited to Cardiff to sit on the 2017 Iris Prize International Jury, and will receive the largest LGBT short film prize in the world – valued at £30,000. The winner will be invited back to the United Kingdom to make another short film, and will benefit from the very best filming equipment and facilities available in the UK, recognised worldwide as the filmmakers’ preferred destination.

The Iris Prize Best British Short

The winner of the Iris Prize Best British Short 2016 will be invited to Cardiff to sit on the 2017 Iris Prize International Jury, and receive a package of sound post-production services sponsored by Pinewood Studios Group, valued at £20,000.

The Iris Prize Best Feature

Chosen by the independent Iris Prize Best Feature Jury, the Iris Prize Festival awards a cash prize of £1,000 to the director of the Iris Prize Best Feature is sponsored by Martin Briggs.

Previous winners

The winner of the 2007 Iris Prize was Pariah, directed by Dee Rees. The 2008 winner was Cowboy, directed by Till Kleinert. Eldar Rapaport won with his film Steam in 2009. In 2010, the prize was won by Magnus Mork for his film The Samaritan. In 2011, Daniel Ribero won for his short I Don’t Want to Go Back Alone. Grant Scicluna won in 2012 for his short The Wilding. In 2013, the Iris Prize was awarded to Tim Marshall for his film Gorilla, and in 2014 Brendon McDonall won for his short All God’s Creatures. Arkasha Stevenson won in 2015 with her short Vessels.

The winner of the 2007 UK Short was Private Life, directed by Abbe Robinson. The 2008 winner was James, directed by Connor Clements. Aleem Khan won with his film Diana in 2009. In 2010, the prize was won by Ana Moreno for her film Mosa. In 2011, Andrew Steggall won for his short The Red Bike. Fabio Youniss won in 2012 for his short A Stable for Disabled Horses. The 2013 winner was My Mother, directed by Jay Bedwani. In 2014, the Iris Prize Best British Short was awarded to Charlie Francis for his film Middle Man, and in 2015 Lloyd Eyre-Morgan won the Iris Prize Best British Short for his film Closets.

The Iris Prize Best Feature 2008 was Dreamboy, directed by James Bolton, and in 2009 the prize was awarded to Redwoods, directed by David Lewis.  The 2010 Best Feature Award went to Nina Nuel for My Friend from Faro, and in 2011 the award went to August, directed by Eldar Rapaport.  The 2012 Best Feature Award went to Sex of Angels, directed by Xavier Vilaverde. In 2013, the Iris Prize Best Feature Award went to Cupcakes, directed by Eytan Fox, and in 2014 the award was presented to Boy Meets Girl, directed by Eric Shaeffer.  In 2015, the award was presented to Fourth Man Out, directed by Andrew Nackman.